The Nutrition for Growth Commitments

World leaders are gathering today in Rio de Janeiro to highlight progress made since the first Nutrition for Growth (N4G) Summit in 2013, and to reaffirm their commitment to ending malnutrition in all its forms. This excerpt from the 2016 Global Nutrition Report reviews the N4G commitments.
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Guest Blog: We won’t end malnutrition without toilets

Ending malnutrition requires action on many fronts, writes Barbara Frost, Chief Executive of WaterAid.
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#NutritionReport: It’s time to put our health at the heart of food systems

Children at a project we support in Bangladesh (photo: Darren Fletcher/Save the Children)

Children at a project we support in Bangladesh (photo: Darren Fletcher/Save the Children)

You’ve got to admit even in a world drowning in facts, the four below from the 2015 Global Nutrition Report are really staggering:

  1. 794 million people do not get the energy they need from their food.
  2. 2 billion do not get the nutrients they need from their food.
  3. 1.9 billion are overweight or obese.
  4. No country is immune to the serious economic and social burdens of malnutrition.

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Live Q&A: What needs to happen NOW to end global malnutrition?

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One of the most pressing challenges facing our planet is malnutrition, which affects citizens of every country in the world from the least developed to the most. >> Read more

Nutrition by the Numbers: Feeding the Data Revolution

When I got my start working on nutrition programs in sub-Saharan Africa thirty years ago, our tools for collecting and reporting data were simple: it was considered a huge innovation when we started using portable computers to calculate anthropometric indices from measures of a child’s height, weight and estimated age, instead of having to look them up manually on a chart. Back then, few of us could have predicted where modern technology would take global health and development data: cell phone reporting systems for healthcare workers, public online data platforms by the World Bank and other major donors, satellite and sensor technology to predict famine and disease outbreaks  – these innovations were unimaginable thirty years ago. >> Read more

Towards the Next Horizon for Nutrition – Capacity Development

No one can deny that the Millennium Development Goals have focused the world’s attention on critical issues and have saved lives. But most of the successes have been unrelated or indirectly related to achievements in improving the nutritional status of the worlds’ most vulnerable—and improving nutrition is one of the most powerful ways to advance health and development. As global leaders move toward the Sustainable Development Goals, we need to invest in leadership and capacity development for improved nutrition.

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Does Fortifying Food Improve Nutrition for the Poorest People?

Globally, deficiencies in micronutrients are staggering in scale. According  to some estimates, between 40 and 60 percent of all children in developing countries suffer negative health consequences from not receiving enough iron, and a similar percentage don’t get enough Vitamin A.

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